Brady & JT, Teen Athletes of the Month September 2021

athletes of the month middletown nj

Meet Brady & JT. They both started in our CrossFit Kids class back in 2018, and have now advanced to our CrossFit Teens class and are absolutely killing it!

These boys have become such well-rounded athletes and have experienced the benefits beyond the box. Brady shares, “It has made me more mentally focused.” And when asked about what keeps him motivated to continue, JT said, “Staying healthy and getting to workout with friends.”

We couldn’t agree more! Working out with friends is definitely much more motivating!

Congratulations to these strong teens: Brady & JT.


Please meet the September 2021 Athletes of the Month: Brady & JT

1. When and why did you start at Salus?

Brady– I started at Salus in June of 2018. I wanted a new workout experience.

JT– I started at Salus in 2018. I wasn’t interested in typical sports so my mom thought I should try CrossFit to get exercise.

2. How has your performance changed since you started at Salus?

Brady– When I started CrossFit I could barely lift 25 pounds. Now I can lift 25 pounds and even heavier weights.

JT– I have gotten much better at doing all of the exercises.

3. Are there exercises you can do now that you couldn’t do before?

Brady– I could not do deadlifts when I started and now I can lift my body weight.

4. How have you changed since you started?

Brady– I have become a lot stronger and have more endurance.  And, it has made me more mentally focused.

JT– I have gotten stronger. It’s made me healthier by having exercise as a regular part of my week.

5. How do you describe Salus to your friends?

Brady– A place where you can put your strength to the test and you will be cheered on.

JT– It helps you to get better and stronger at certain exercises.

6. What keeps you motivated to continue?

Brady– The thing that keeps me motivated is I want to get stronger every day.

JT– Staying healthy and getting to workout with friends.

7. Favorite exercise or WOD?

Brady– Deadlifts

JT– Murphy

8. What advice would you give to a newbie just joining Salus?

Brady– I would tell them to take it slow.

JT– It gets easier the more you do it.

9. What is your next goal to accomplish?

Brady– 15 minute AMRAP:  15 kettle bell swings; 10 deadlifts; 200 m row.

JT– Double unders

10. Favorite healthy dish….and favorite “splurge” meal?

Brady– Healthy dish is fruit salad and splurge meal is tacos!

JT– Meatballs and pizza

11. Favorite thing to do for fun?

Brady– Play my Xbox with my friends.

JT– Video games

12. If you could be a superhero/animal who/what would you be and why?

Brady– I would be Iron Man because he is not only strong but very smart.

JT– I would be a lion because they are strong.

13. Favorite motivational/Inspirational quote?

Brady– “Push yourself because no one else is going to do it for you.”

14. Interesting fact not many people know about you.

BradyI love playing tennis.

JT– I have a big family with 20 cousins and I collect retro video games.

Team Sports Strength and Conditioning

strength conditioning teams Middletown NJ

Calling all Football, Cheerleading, Soccer athletes (and more!)! Take your team to the next level and help prevent injuries with team sports strength and conditioning training at Salus in Middletown, NJ.

What is Team Sports Strength and Conditioning

At Salus, we work directly with sports teams throughout Monmouth County, New Jersey to bring athletes together for a private strength and conditioning class built just for their team. Our coaching staff has worked with athletes involved in gymnastics, soccer, football, cheerleading, dance, softball, baseball, hockey, lacrosse and more.

Athletes have consistently found that training at CrossFit Salus has improved their strength, power, speed, coordination, and endurance for their sport. We also focus on building strong team spirit with players working alongside each other and encourage team motivation and sportsmanship.

A team sports strength and conditioning program can benefit all athletes, both male and female. The benefits are numerous: it can help reduce the incidence of injury, reduce burnout, improve performance and much more!

Prevent Injury

Youth athletes often experience many changes in life and in sport through their growth and development process. While early sport specialization has trended towards becoming prevalent in the youth athlete, it is vital to expose individuals to a variety of movements to help them become a well rounded athlete.

This can also help to prevent injuries due to overtraining and overcompensation.

This is why youth athletes need to work regularly with a qualified strength and conditioning coach to ensure these potential injuries don’t become an issue.

A recent study finds that “kids who specialize in a chosen sport tend to engage in higher levels of vigorous exercise than their peers and may be more likely to sustain injuries, such as stress fractures, tendinitis and ACL tears.”

The study, published in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, helps to explain some of the dangers of sports specialization. “Athletes who focus on one particular sport tend to practice more frequently and intensely compared to athletes who do not.”

The recommendation?

Replace some of their sport-specific training with different forms of exercise, such as conditioning.

A common fear among parents is that if their children don’t play more and more, they’ll fall behind in their sport and won’t ultimately be as good of an athlete. The study says, “But it may actually be the opposite. If children do too much, they may get injured and fall behind.”

Strengthen Your Athletic Performance and Gain the Winning Advantage

Working with a professional coach who specializes in strength and conditioning for athletes is important not only to help prevent injuries, but also to improve athletic performance. Resistance training, stability, coordination, movement efficiency and mobility can have a big impact for a young athlete.

By working with professionals, athletes can improve their speed, agility, quickness, conditioning and range of motion. With a well-designed strength and conditioning program, athletes will see what their body is capable of and what they can accomplish, enhancing a sense of self-confidence and body image. This advantage not only helps them in their sport, but in all avenues of life.

Plus, we know how to make exercise fun! They’re still kids after all, exercise should have an element of fun and not feel like a chore. Our coaches like to mix things up to help athletes prevent physical and mental burnout.

Schedule Your Private Team Sports Strength and Conditioning at Salus

At Salus, we offer Kids and Teens Fitness classes throughout the week that athletes can join at any time.

If you are interested in keeping your group together, Private Team sports strength and conditioning sessions are one hour dedicated entirely to that team’s specific training. Cycles last anywhere from 4-8 weeks depending on the team’s needs. Our coaches can work with you to find the best days and times to meet your players’ needs.

*From elementary to high school and travel teams, various ages are welcome (typically ages 9 and up).

Contact Coach Angela at info@salusnj.com for more information or to receive Team pricing.

Traveling to a New CrossFit Box? CrossFit Drop in Etiquette: What You Need to Know Before You Go.

Traveling to a new box? Check out these five CrossFit drop in etiquette reminders to help you be the best guest and have the best experience.

Whether you’re traveling for a business trip across the country or for an exotic vacation across the equator, it can be exciting to try out a new CrossFit box so you don’t miss out on your workout. Thankfully, one of the great things about CrossFit is the community, so you’re in luck.

But, make sure you scope out their rules first. Remember, CrossFit is an affiliate, not a franchise…so each box has their own guidelines for dropping in (programming, prices, etc.).

These five CrossFit drop in etiquette reminders will help you be prepared before you go…and be a good guest.

CrossFit Drop In Etiquette: What You Need to Know Before You Go.

1. Searching for a “Drop-In CrossFit Near Me”

Do your homework before you take off. Your best bet is to start by searching the CrossFit Affiliate Map or the “Wodifind” feature within your Wodify app. Once you find a couple CrossFit boxes near where you’ll be staying, Google them. Read their reviews and scope out their social media pages to get a feel for their vibe.

2. Consider Their CrossFit Drop-In Fee

Every box is different, so be sure to check their website for details.

Some boxes require you to have your home affiliate email them to confirm that you’ve completed their fundamentals class.
Some have particular classes for drop-ins (you’ll usually find this in vacation spots), others allow drop-ins for any class. Don’t expect to just show up and have free-reign of their gym.
Some boxes require you to book your spot in class and pay ahead of time online, others will discount the drop-in fee if you buy a t-shirt. Either way, expect to pay – as a traveling guest, you’re a “drop-in,” not a “free-trial.”

Always email or call them ahead of time to get the scoop on their policies, especially if you’re traveling over a holiday.

3. Allow Enough Time

Early is On Time, On Time is Late, and Late is Unacceptable.

Allow enough time to fill out your waiver, pay for your drop-in and hey, you’ve been traveling…you’ll probably need to mobilize. Take a minute to introduce yourself to the coach and a few members, familiarize yourself with the gym and scope out their t-shirts! You can never have enough CrossFit swag, am I right?

Nothing is worse than having a new face show up in the middle of a warm up and trying to get them situated while keeping the rest of the class going.

4. Know Your Abilities

Whether you’re an elite athlete or fresh out of fundamentals, you’re a newbie to them. Know your own abilities and limitations…and remember to leave your ego at the door. Now’s not the time to attempt your first RX workout if it’s way beyond your abilities.

And if you’re nursing an injury, be sure to inform the coach ahead of time (you know, when you arrive early).

5. Leave on a Good Note

Remember the universal rule, no matter where you go: be a good guest & clean up after yourself. Put away your equipment, disinfect your things and hey, if you spilled some chalk, clean that up, too.

Visiting other CrossFit boxes is a lot of fun. So, don’t be afraid to snap a selfie and take a moment to drop them a review on their Facebook or Google page. Reviews are extremely valuable to a small business.

Save travels!

Dropping in at CrossFit Salus, Middletown NJ?

Traveling to the Middletown, New Jersey area? We’d love to have you!

We offer drop-in options all of our for our CrossFit, Weightlifting, CrossFit Kids and CrossFit Teens classes! Just shoot us an email at info@salusnj.com before you come so we can get you set up.

We’re located at 1706 State Highway 35 in Middletown, NJ (Located in the Fountain Ridge Plaza). We’re soon moving to 1680 (same plaza).

Schedule Your Drop In Here >>

Maintaining Your Health & Nutrition During Travel

Vacations and traveling can put a damper on our health and nutrition goals in more ways than one. From added stress and interrupted sleep to more time seated and limited healthy food options, it’s frustrating to lose all the momentum you’ve gained recently.

Don’t let one week undo all your progress and detour you from your goals. Maintaining health and nutrition during travel is easier than you may think.

How? You just need to get a little creative with your choices and (gasp) be OK with plan B.

Here are a few travel tips to help you stay healthy, keep stress low and actually enjoy your time away.

Exercise (Or Not?)

If traveling tends to create a lot of stress for you (packing, airport security, delays, etc.) adding in high intensity exercise may not be the best idea. Vacations are an optimal time to take a recovery week, not the time to compromise sleep just so you can squeeze in an before sunrise workout.

But, if your schedule is flexible and you’re not under a lot of stress, I recommend making your workout a priority!

When you’re out of your normal routine, this is a great opportunity to switch things up and get creative. Add in more body weight movements, drop in a a local box or add in more mobility work. Additionally, you can go for a jog to familiarize yourself with the area, get your blood flowing and enjoy some fresh air, which can all help you reduce stress.

Recovery

Mentioned above, time away is a good opportunity to get the quality rest that your body needs and deserves. As you’re aware, quality sleep is essential for the basic functioning of your neurological, immune, digestive and endocrine systems. It also does wonders for your hormones…which is directly related to weight-loss goals, performance goals and so much more.

If you’re in a hotel room, blackout the windows as much as possible, bring your eye mask, unplug any unnecessary alarm clocks and nightlights, keep the room temperature cool and unplug from your phone and TV at least an hour before bed.

Stick to your normal bedtime routine – that means if you normally shower, read and stretch before bed at home, you should do that in your hotel room as well.

Traveling is also an optimal time to focus on mobility and lots of stretching. Check out MobilityWOD, GOWOD Mobility First or RomWod if you need some guidance.

Reduce Jet Lag

If you’re traveling to a different time zone that last longer than one week, consider moving all of your activities, such as meals and bed times, up by an hour for a few days before your departure date. For any shorter trips that last shorter than a week, try to stay on your home time zone as much as possible.

Stay hydrated (even more than usual) – that means avoiding caffeine and alcohol.

Once you arrive to your destination, try to get exposure to early morning sun, which helps to rest your body’s circadian rhythm.

Nutrition On-The-Go

Airplane food is never optimal if you’re focused on quality nutrition. To ensure you get sufficient fuel, prepare plenty of healthy and convenient snacks and a to-go meal.

I typically pack:

  • Crudites (carrots, celery, cucumber, peppers, snap peas)
  • Fresh fruit (apples, oranges, grapes…also very hydrating)
  • Jerky (ex: Epic Bars)
  • Protein Powder in zip lock bags (remember your shaker bottle)
  • Bars (ex: RXBar, Lara Bar, Joes)
  • Nuts and dried mango (no sugar added)
  • Tea bags (herbal and green)
  • Reusable water bottle to fill up after I get through security

If I’m traveling during a mealtime, I usually pack a big salad with chicken to eat on the plane.

Tip: if you toss in frozen veggies, like peas, that will help to keep the meal chilled until it’s time to eat.

Eating Once You’re There

Before your trip, do your research to map out healthy restaurants near you. Having a plan of attack before you land will help to reduce any anxiety about where to eat and what to eat on vacation. Search on Google for keywords like “healthy,” “paleo,” “local,” “gluten-free,” etc. Scope out menus in advance and even call the restaurants to see what substitutions they are willing to make.

Consider a trip to a nearby grocery store or market to pick up healthy snacks and mini-meal options. Or check out if AmazonFresh or InstaCart will deliver to your area.

Be OK with Plan B

Your brain likes a plan, but there’s only so much you can control when you’re traveling. The best thing you can do is go with the flow and be OK with plan B (and C & D). Don’t stress about being perfect with your nutrition when traveling or fitting in your workout.

Stress, by the way, is one of the biggest causes of digestive problems. That means that even if you’re eating clean, but you’re stressed out of your mind, you’re hindering the absorption of vital nutrients you’re attempting to get from a whole food diet.

A few years ago, we went on a “vacation” to Disney World with our 8 year old twins. For those of you who have been to Disney, know it’s not much of a relaxing vacation (at all). One big thing I learned on this trip is not to not allow the weight of the things we cannot control to hold us back. There’s freedom and there’s power in letting go.

Instead, I focused my energy on the things I could control. The chaos, the rain, the lines…those were all OUT of my control. I stayed the course with my nutrition as much as possible, got super creative with my choices and was very selective with any indulgences. Mickey waffle with fake syrup? No thanks. Chocolate covered strawberry? Yes, please! 

Listen, when you’re out of your routine, you’re presented with a unique temptation to give in, but I encourage you to hang in there and be selective of what you choose to indulge in. You’ll have more energy and be much happier when you get back. And while you’re away, strive for progress… not perfection, remember to keep celebrating small victories and be thankful for the challenges — as they are opportunities to learn and improve.

Richard Crocker Athlete of the Month August 2021

Like so many of us this past year (plus), finding a place we can go to escape the worries of the day, relieve some stress and connect with other like-minded people has been so important. Although Rich joined the Salus community this past April, he was getting involved at home with is wife. In his words, “It got my mind off of what was going on in the world even if it was just for an hour.”

Congratulations Rich, you are an inspiration and we love having as part of the community.


Please meet the August 2021 Athlete of the Month: Rich Crocker

1. When and why did you start at Salus?

I started Salus in the beginning of April. During COVID, I was doing the WODs with Cherie (my wife) and I really enjoyed our workouts together.

It got my mind off of what was going on in the world even if it was just for an hour.

2. How has your performance changed since you started at Salus?

I have given myself the award of “Most Improved Athlete.”

My first couple weeks were really tough on me, but I could see the progression each week. In the beginning I was taking breaks in what seemed to be every minute but now my endurance is off the charts from where I started.

I find myself finishing off the workouts stronger everyday.

3. Are there exercises you can do now that you couldn’t do before?

It took me a while but I’m finally able to do cleans, snatches and get on the wall for handstand push-ups.

4. How has your body physically changed since you started?

I feel fitter overall. My arms are more defined and abs are starting to show.

5. How has Salus changed you in other ways?

This has been the biggest benefit of Salus. It starts with falling asleep quicker and sleeping straight through the night.

My mood has been great in the morning, which sets the tone for the day.

I feel that I’m not overwhelmed and I’m taking care of one task at a time instead of overwhelming myself with all the things I have to do for the day.

6. How do you describe Salus to your friends?

“The best hour of my day!”

7. What keeps you motivated to continue?

The physical changes are always great, but it’s seeing Coach Gino and the group I get to workout with everyday.

It’s a mentality that we are all in this together while trying to push our body’s to the limit. I just love completing the WODs and seeing the improvement on my time or lifts each week.

8. Favorite WOD?

Any WOD that involves a run/rower into a lift.

9. What advice would you give to a newbie just joining Salus?

Everyone started where you are today. And remember that everyone is here to motivate and help.

10. What is your next goal to accomplish?

I have two goals:

Handstand Push-ups and Kipping Pull-ups.

11. If you could design your own WOD, what would it look like?

3 rounds for time
500 meter row
10 deadlifts
15 box jumps
20 push-ups

12. Favorite thing to do for fun?

Besides CrossFit? Movie nights with my wife and kids.

13. Favorite healthy dish….and favorite “splurge” meal?

Lean steak and broccolini.

Splurge: Burger and fries.

14. If you could be a superhero, who would you be and why?

Superman because he can do anything.

15. Favorite motivational quote?

“The only thing standing between you and your goal is the bullsh*t story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it.” – Jordan Belfort

16. Interesting fact not many people know about you.

I sold storage units for Manhattan Mini Storage, Cable TV for RCN NY and garments that prevent blood clots for CTC before I got into the Restaurant business.

Yuliya Lee Athlete of the Month July 2021

Like many of the moms who do CrossFit at Salus in Middletown, NJ, Yuliya was on a mission to get back in shape after having her second child. Drawn to the challenging environment, welcoming community, and mood-boosting endorphins, she decided to join. Within just four months of doing CrossFit and Nutrition Coaching, she has already lost over 30 pounds and is strong enough to carry 2 kids to and from the beach with ease.

Congratulations to this strong mamma. Yuliya, you are an inspiration and we love having as part of the community.


Please meet the July 2021 Athlete of the Month: Yuliya Lee

1. When and why did you start at Salus?

April 1st, 2021.

I’ve made a bet with my hubby who will get 6 pack abs first. 😝 Just kidding. We actually did make a bet in January 2020, but then 2 weeks later I found out I was pregnant. So after the birth of my youngest, I really wanted to get back in shape. I started to Google “tough workout,” because I knew myself, Pilates and yoga are not my cup of tea (of course there is nothing wrong with those) I just needed to get results ASAP. So, I decided to try Martial arts and CrossFit at Salus.

After trying both, it was an easy choice.

CrossFit was exactly what I needed. And I never regret my decision.

2. How has your performance changed since you started at Salus?

Tremendously.

3. Are there exercises you can do now that you couldn’t do before?

Well, you name it, LOL…
Handstand push-ups seemed surreal, I actually fell down when I tried my first handstand.

I couldn’t do toes to bar, double unders or even 1 regular push-up.

Now I can and I’m feeling proud.

4. How has your body physically changed since you started?

I’ve lost 30+ pounds for 3.5 months.

5. How has Salus changed you in other ways?

For me it started with one main goal – lose extra postpartum weight. However, now it is transforming more and more to a lifestyle of healthy choices.

  • I have more energy.
  • I’m stronger.
  • I can carry 2 kids (extra 42 lbs) at a time from the beach (15min walk) because one can’t walk yet and another one has scraped knee. And It doesn’t bother me.
  • I feel great.
  • I feel more confident.
  • I feel happier.

6. How do you describe Salus to your friends?

This awesome ever challenging tough workout that never gets boring and after completion of which endorphins kick in and you feel exhausted, sweaty but yet happy.

7. What keeps you motivated to continue?

Because I have 3 kids under 5 years old. I want to be strong for them. I need to be strong for them.

I need to be healthy, because I want to enjoy life with them as long as possible.

8. Favorite lift or WOD?

Oh, man, I looooove tabata. It’s different.

In regard of lift, probably “Deadlift”. It is the one that is easier to master.

With cleans and jerks it’s too much technique to process. My brain registers everything that coaches say: knees here, hands there, back like this, tummy like that, chest up, head straight, use legs, forget about arms, just like a zipper, just like a scarecrow, just pull yourself under the bar, don’t lift with arms, shoulders there, hips here, just dip under the bar, head out, heels grounded, elbows up… AAAhhh😳, trust me I hear you! I understand you! It’s just my body doesn’t follow 🤭, (he-he-he). But it’s ok. I’ll get it!

9. What advice would you give to a newbie just joining Salus?

Don’t give up trying.

Don’t be discouraged after completing the WOD, even if you come in last (at some point those people also were last).

Just keep on moving and keep on trying. One of the worst things you can do – is do nothing.

Just keep on trying.

10. What is your next goal to accomplish?

Click that RX button more! 😝

11. If you could design your own WOD, what would it look like?

  • 10 wall balls
  • 10 pull-ups
  • 10 barbell thrusters
  • 10 pistols
  • 10 handstand push-ups.
  • 3 min rest.

Repeat.

12. Favorite thing to do for fun?

I don’t have one thing. I have a lot. 😛
Spend quality / adventurous time with family and friends: have a God centered fellowship, playing soccer, doing murder mystery, game nights, traveling, doing escape room, visit new places, create new traditions…

13. Favorite healthy dish….and favorite “splurge” meal?

I love king crab legs and I do love some home fried potatoes with onion, garlic and dill.

My splurge? Chocolate mousse cake. Yum! Have you tried one from the Cheesecake Factory?

(on the side note: back when I watched “Friends” in Ukraine (where I’m originally from) there was an episode “The one with all the cheesecakes” and they ate it from the floor. I didn’t get it and it wasn’t funny, but rather disgusting… well, let’s just say I didn’t eat one from the floor, but it took me years to actually get the joke. Ha-ha.)

14. If you could be a superhero who would you be and why?

Hmm, not sure about a superhero, but if I had super powers I’d protect the little ones who cannot protect themselves. My heart is yearning for innocent children who are abused, kidnaped… and for innocent animals who are getting killed. I know those are 2 completely different categories, but I feel like I need to do something, I’m just not yet sure what exactly. I wish AAALLL the children would be happy, and loved, and cared, and nourished. I wish that people would leave animals alone. I guess I just need to pray more about it, to know if I can do anything in that regard to be helpful.

15. Favorite motivational quote?

“Be water, my friend.” by Bruce Lee.

“Empty your mind. Be formless, shapeless like water … now you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup … you put water into a bottle, it becomes the bottle … put it in a teapot, it becomes the teapot … water can flow … water can crash … be water, my friend.”

16. Interesting fact not many people know about you.

I’m not actually sure when was the first time I met my husband. I’ve pinpointed it to a year.
(but hey, don’t ask me which year, it’s gonna take me a few minutes to think about it, lol 🤦‍♀️)

Healthy Swaps

So we’ve purged some obvious sugar culprits in our pantry and gotten clear on our WHY. Let’s step it up a notch by swapping out one (or more) of those sCRAP-py (sugar-filled, completely refined and processed) foods you found earlier this week for a cleaner version. 

While whole and fresh foods are strongly encouraged, I also recognize that having a well stocked pantry, fridge and freezer can be time saving while adding flexibility to your meal choices. Your challenge today is to identify a healthier version of one of your typical packaged foods.

Here are a few healthy swaps to try:

Flour/Baking

Pre/Post Workout

Other

 

Salad Dressing: 

Salad dressing can be loaded with sugar and preservatives. Don’t be fooled by low-fat or fat-free labels. You may think that you are doing yourself a favor if you choose these versions of salad dressings, but they are actually even worse when it comes to hidden sugars.

Try this homemade Basic Vinaigrette recipe instead:

  • 1 Tablespoon no sugar added balsamic vinegar (check the label – some have sugar)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • Whisk all ingredients together until well blended.

What’s Driving the Urge to Eat?

Beyond finding a swap, it’s also important to address what’s truly driving the urge to eat. Such as if your blood sugar is low. Low blood sugar could mean that you are skipping meals, spacing them out too much, or you’re not eating enough blood sugar-steadying protein. 

Try instead pairing a simple carbohydrate with protein, like mixed nuts and fruit. The healthy fat in the nuts helps to slow down the absorption of the fruit’s natural sugar so that you get back into balance and are better able to control cravings.

What swap did you make?  Take a picture and share it with the group!

Take the sCRAP-py Food Quiz

You already know that consuming too many sCRAP-py (sugar-filled & completely refined and processed) foods can halt your goals (and it’s no bueno for your health). Yet, it’s found in practically everything we eat (way more than you may realize).

Let’s figure out any patterns as to why you eat what you eat…and when you eat it. Is it within acceptable limits, totally out of whack, or somewhere in between? This quiz is a powerful tool to help you start your journey to understanding and limiting processed foods and sugar intake.

1. How often do you eat or drink sugary foods or beverages including those made with artificial sweeteners?

a. Once or twice a month at most. I’m not big on sweets.
b. Have dessert a couple of times a week but I rarely drink regular or diet soda.
c. Pretty much every day

2. How much sugar or sweetener do you usually add to coffee?

a. None
b. A teaspoon or one packet.
c. 2 teaspoons or two packets. At least.

3. What does your typical breakfast look like?

a. Scrambled eggs with veggies, avocado toast, or even last night’s leftovers.
b. Greek yogurt, oatmeal with fruit, or a shake.
c. Sugary cereal, a muffin, donut, or a not-so-healthy bar.

4. How often do you go out of your way to get something sCRAP-py, like stopping at the store just to buy some ice cream.

a. Almost never.
b. Every once in a while if I get a crazy craving for something.
c. Often… like at least once a week.

5. Do you ever eat food in secret?

a. No. If I’m indulging, it’s part of a meal or an event with others.
b. A couple times a year. I definitely feel like polishing off some ice cream or a bag of chips on the couch by myself.
c. I usually wait to eat those foods until I’m alone so I can eat without anyone judging me.

6. Do you ever hide food just to eat them later?

a. No. Never.
b. Not usually. But, if I know there is just a little bit left of my favorite splurge left, I might rearrange some things in the refrigerator just to make it harder for anyone else to find.
c. Yes. I have a stash of my favorites to eat when I’m by myself.

7. Do you ever feel powerless in front of certain foods, like chips, bread, or cookies?

a. Rarely. It just doesn’t tempt me.
b. Maybe once in a while, if I’m hangry. But, I can usually have one or two and then stop.
c. Yes. Usually once I start eating stuff like that it’s hard to stop. Even if I’m already full.

8. While indulging, have you ever gone overboard and told yourself that “this is the last time I’ll ever eat like this again?”

a. Not really. Maybe one or two times.
b. I tried cutting out sCRAP-py foods in the past but nothing ever works.
c. I tell myself that a lot and end up feeling guilty when I don’t follow through.

Count up how many times you choose each letter, then read the descriptions below to determine your sCRAP-py food dependence and how this challenge will help you move forward.

MOSTLY A’s: Congratulations! Sounds like you don’t have a whacked-out sCRAP-py food diet (Sugar-filled & Completely Refined And Processed). However, you can still benefit from this challenge. Throughout the next three weeks we will reveal lots of amazing tips to help you make even more lasting changes. Take it to the next level by eating mindfully.

MOSTLY B’s: You are in good command of your sCRAP-py food intake, but there’s always room for growth. This challenge will make you even wiser about your choices and learn great tips to swap out the junk and stay on track with your goals.

MOSTLY C’s: Sounds like sCRAP-py foods are a frequent choice for you, so you may be hooked. I’m here to help get unhooked! To jump-start your efforts and break free of this trap, start by getting clear on your WHY.

Connect!

Have you joined the private Facebook Challenge group yet? Being a part of the community will not only help you to stay accountable with your own goals, but also see how others are doing, find support, share your successes and struggles, and of course, get some great, new meal ideas.

Is Sugar Bad? Plus Hidden Names for Sugar

Is sugar bad? Will sugar make me gain weight? When is it OK to eat sugar?

Many of us think of sugar as the white stuff people put in their coffee and the stuff that makes up most of those cereals in the breakfast “food” aisle. Sugars also occur naturally in many whole foods such as fruits, vegetables and even whole grains. You recognize these as “carbs.”

Along with sugar, the macronutrient carbohydrates also includes starch (potatoes or rice), fiber (husks of whole grains), etc. The more complex the molecule, the slower it digests. That’s why eating more fiber can help us feel fuller for longer. Sugars, on the other hand, are simple- they digest very quickly. In other words:

Sugars are a type of carbohydrate, but not all carbohydrates are sugars.

The above point is vital to understand, because it teaches us that not all carbs do the same things in (and for) our bodies.

Let’s take a fresh look at sugar now and address the question many are wondering: is sugar bad?

Eating Sugar: The Good. The Bad. The Ugly.

Is Sugar Bad? Well, It Can Be Ugly.

No doubt, this is a difficult topic to address because most of us are emotionally attached to where we stand on food, especially sugar.

Try talking about the topic at the dinner table and you’ll be just as welcome as if you were talking about politics. Trust me, I’ve been there.

Did you know that most U.S. adults consume about 22 teaspoons of added sugars every day. That’s way more than what the American Heart Association recommends, which is  no more than 6 teaspoons (100 calories) a day of sugar for most women and no more than 9 teaspoons (150 calories) a day for most men. Sugar impacts our brain function, it can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and can increase your risk of heart disease.

And sugar is hiding everywhere.

Over 68% of barcoded food products sold in the US contain added sweeteners—even if they are labeled as “natural” or “healthy.” The safest way to ensure you’re not ingesting excess added sugars is to get in the habit of reading the ingredient list below before you add them to cart.

Added sugars fall under all kinds of different names on ingredient labels.  As a side note, the higher up an ingredient is on an ingredient list, the more of it will be included in that product. Find an ingredient ending in “ose” on the top of the list, put the product down. Many of those sugary products are empty, meaning they have no other nutrients associated with them. These products generally contain little protein, fat, fiber, vitamins or minerals.

Common Hidden Names for Sugar

(Excluding artificial sweeteners and sugar substitutes)

‍Basic Simple Sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides):

  • Dextrose
  • Fructose
  • Galactose
  • Glucose
  • Lactose
  • Maltose
  • Sucrose

Solid or Granulated Sugars:

  • Beet sugar
  • Brown sugar
  • Cane juice crystals
  • Cane sugar
  • Castor sugar
  • Coconut sugar
  • Confectioner’s sugar (aka, powdered sugar)
  • Corn syrup solids
  • Crystalline fructose
  • Date sugar
  • Demerara sugar
  • Dextrin
  • Diastatic malt
  • Ethyl maltol
  • Florida crystals
  • Golden sugar
  • Glucose syrup solids
  • Grape sugar
  • Icing sugar
  • Maltodextrin
  • Muscovado sugar
  • Panela sugar
  • Raw sugar
  • Sugar (granulated or table)
  • Sucanat
  • Turbinado sugar
  • Yellow sugar

Liquid or Syrup Sugars:

  • Agave Nectar/Syrup
  • Barley malt
  • Blackstrap molasses
  • Brown rice syrup
  • Buttered sugar/buttercream
  • Caramel
  • Carob syrup
  • Corn syrup
  • Evaporated cane juice
  • Fruit juice
  • Fruit juice concentrate
  • Golden syrup
  • High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)
  • Honey
  • Invert sugar
  • Malt syrup
  • Maple syrup
  • Molasses
  • Rice syrup
  • Refiner’s syrup
  • Sorghum syrup
  • Treacle

Looking Deeper

Let’s look deeper at ten common sweeteners:

  1. AGAVE NECTAR (Agave Syrup)- found in cereals, ice cream, and “healthy” organic foods. This sweetener is more concentrated than HFCS (High-Fructose Corn Syrup), so use cautiously.
  2. BARLEY MALT- found in beers, cereals, and candy bars. This grain-based sugar is half as sweet as white sugar, but it’s just as high on the glycemic index.
  3. BEET SUGAR- found in more than 20 percent of the world’s sugar. But don’t be fooled, the word beet suggests this sugar is natural, but it’s not. The beets used for this refined sugar are stripped of their nutrients when processed for use in many packaged foods.
  4. BROWN SUGAR- found in baked goods, sauces, beverages. Brown sugar is just as bad for you as table sugar. The only real difference? How it tastes and how it has been processed. 
  5. CANE JUICE (Evaporated Cane Juice)- found in yogurt, lemonade, liquor. Although less processed than table sugar and contains more riboflavin, it’s benefit is negligible. 
  6. CANE SUGAR- found in 80% of the world’s sugar. Multiple studies have shown how cane sugar drastically raises blood pressure and cholesterol and also contributes to insulin resistance. 
  7. CORN SYRUP (High-Fructose Corn Syrup)- found in sodas, cereal bars, bread, junk foods, fast food. Corn syrup is 100% glucose. Just one tablespoon contains 16 grams of carbohydrates. To make HFCS, enzymes are added to corn syrup to convert some of the glucose to fructose making HFCS “high” in fructose compared to the pure glucose found in corn syrup. Your body metabolizes this sugar in a way that encourages body-fat storage.
  8. EVAPORATED CANE JUICE- found in baked goods, cereals and many beverages. Actually not a juice, evaporated cane juice is a sweetener derived from sugar cane syrup making it much more concentrated than a juice with trace amounts of nutrients. 
  9. FRUCTOSE- found in baked goods, but also occurs naturally in fruits and honey. Ingesting added fructose (not naturally occurring) has been linked to rising obesity rates over the past several decades. When you eat a piece of fruit, you also get a healthy dose of fiber that can help to slow the absorption of sugar and provide a wide variety of phytonutrients and minerals that can counteract the effects of sugar. Nobody does it better than nature.
  10. HONEY (raw honey)- Honey is higher in fructose than table sugar and it weighs more than the white stuff, so it’s more calorically dense at 21 calories per teaspoon vs 16 cals for table sugar. On the plus side, honey is sweeter than table sugar, so you won’t need to use as much.

Sugar in Cereal

Stay with me for a moment while I go on a little rant.

About cereal.

Yes, I know, most Americans love their breakfast cereals (I grew up eating cereal – though my parents saved the extra sugary stuff for Saturdays). Cereal is bright & colorful, it’s sweet, it’s super convenient….and we mistakenly think it’s good for us and our kids.

And cereal brands spend millions of dollars every year marketing to our kids to make us think that. In fact, during kids TV shows the top category of advertised food is… you guessed it, cereal (even beating out candy, other snacks and fast food).

Did You Know:

  • On average, cereal’s that are marketed to children have more than 40% more sugars than “adult” cereals, and more than 2x the sugar of oatmeal.
  • According to EWG’s analysis, Kellogg’s Honey Smacks (which used to be called Sugar Smacks) leads the list of one of the highest-sugar cereals.
  • And, even with the update in food label regulations, since serving sizes on cereal labels are still unrealistically small, many adults and children will typically eat more than one “serving” in a single sitting. And according to FDA’s analysis of food consumption data, 97 percent of the most common cold cereals underestimate the amount of cereal people actually eat.

Bottom line: most cereals are just as sweet as cookies and should not be considered a part of healthy meal.  But, if you just can’t give up cereal, use common sense, read the ingredient label, and as always, don’t believe any information printed on the front of the box.

Eating Sugar: The Good

OK, thanks for hanging in with me.

Now about the good.

Somewhere along the way, we started hating on all sources carbs. But (all) carbohydrates are not the enemy here.

We need carbohydrates for energy. They are energy-packed compounds that give us quick energy. This is why choosing the right source of food where those sugars come from is so important.

It should go without saying that you’ll find much more sugar in processed foods than in whole, nutrient-dense foods.

Along with starch and fiber, sugars live under the larger umbrella: carbohydrates. The more complex the molecule, the slower digestion takes. Simple sugars, like from fruit, digest quickly and can have a positive effect in the right amount at the right time (ie: right before/during/after exercise). Starch and fiber, which is a much more complex molecule, digests slowly and help you feel fuller, for longer.

Unfortunately, one problem we’re faced with is this strange notion in our culture that if you’ve worked really hard in a workout, you deserve a big, gooey, sugary treat. Maybe this satisfies an emotional hunger temporarily, but it is certainly not what your body needs after a training session. Get clear. What your body needs is some real, whole foods.

When in doubt, opt for a diet mostly composed of lean meats, vegetables, essential fats, little starch, little fruit and plenty of water. Your body, your training and your health will thank you big time!

Why Does Sugar Taste Good?!

Sugar tastes good, partially because when it’s in its natural state, whole foods, like berries, are full of good stuff like vitamins, minerals, and energy. Our bodies are naturally attracted to them.

But everyone is different. Some of us pull the dessert plate closer after dinner while others can easily shrug off grandma’s pumpkin pie. Some of us simply respond to sugar more than others which could be from genetics or something we learned growing up. Which brings us to the next question number.

Will Eating Sugar Make Me Gain Weight?

The over-consumption of foods that have added sugars (not generally those foods that have naturally occurring sugars) can contribute to health problems such as diabetes and obesity. Added sugars feed yeast and bad bacteria in our bodies which can damage our intestinal wall, increasing intestinal permeability, AKA: leaky gut. That can trigger chronic, low-grade inflammation and lead to the transfer of substances from our gut into our bloodstream. In turn, this can lead to obesity and other chronic, metabolic diseases.

Plus, if we eat more processed, sugary foods, we’re probably taking in more energy (calories) overall. Many of these foods are tasty, in fact they’re engineered to make it hard for you to stop eating. And since we digest and use their energy very quickly, these processed foods tend to overstimulate our brain’s reward/pleasure centers which can lead to weight gain and even obesity. Data from the USDA tracking food intake from a variety of angles show consistent trends. Since 1980, Americans have continued to eat about the same total amount of fat, yet ate more carbohydrates, especially refined ones with added sugars. Over this time, the obesity rates in the United States have also grown significantly.

The World Health Organization defines “obese” as having a Body Mass Index higher than 30. Of course, some fit and muscular athletes tend to have a higher BMI even though they still have a low percentage of body fat. So, let’s look at those number for a moment. Currently, the average body fat percentage for women is about 40%, for men: 28%. To compare, the “healthy” range for a woman should be around 22-33%, and for men, that range should be around 11-22%.

While we can’t blame one single thing alone, including sugar for all the health problems and obesity surge (sleep & stress factor in, too), multiple studies do show that an increased sugar consumption does correlate with increased obesity levels, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,  leaky gut, diabetes and cancer.

How Much Sugar Should I (Can I) Eat?

Remember: Sugar (alone) doesn’t provide nourishment. No vitamins, no minerals, no fiber, no antioxidants, phytonutrients or  hydration.

Sugar from nutrient-dense, whole foods, like fruit on the other hand, contains sugar, but they provide numerous positive health benefits.

When it comes to how much sugar (from whole foods) you should eat, everyone is different and has unique energy needs. Some people do well cutting sugar out of their diet (almost) completely, while others thrive on a high-carb diet. Some athletes will count their sugar intake down to the gram, while others do well with the general guideline of “eating less-processed foods & more healthy foods” and be very successful.

As a general guideline, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2015-2020) recommends limiting sugar to 10% of your intake. So, for example, if you’re eating 2000 calories per day, that would be about 50 grams, or 200 calories from sugar.

Start reading food labels to get a clear look at how much sugar you’re actually eating. Remember, it tends to hide in packaged foods (a lot). So, better than that, eat more foods without a label (like fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds, meat and seafood, etc.).

When Should I Eat Sugar?

As far as when to eat sugar from nutrient-dense carbohydrates, it’s very specific to your body type, time of training, training intensity, training duration, stress levels, health/illness and a slew of other factors. Nutrient timing is very specific. When done right, it can positively affect your performance and recovery, but what works for your training partner (or a template) may not work for you. In fact, it could actually backfire.

In general, your pre-workout meals should be consumed about 1-2 hours before training. It should be carbohydrate-rich (about half complex and half simple, which can be consumed during the workout depending on workout length), moderate in protein and fiber and low in fat. Intra-nutrition and post nutrition are just as specific as pre-workout nutrition.

Much of your performance success is dependent on how well you eat. So, remember this, even if you’re eating the “right number of macros” or counting your sugar grams before and after your workout, it can make a negative impact on your goals if those macros are coming from processed foods.

How Sweet It Isn’t. Should I Choose Low-Sugar Foods?

If you’re sidelining your sugar habit, be careful of adding another unhealthy habit with artificial sweetness. That’s not the right answer…at all.

When you consume these nonnutritive (“no nutrition”) chemical sweeteners, they stimulate sweetness in your mouth and the body naturally expects the carbohydrates to follow. But, they’re faking it. When carbs don’t follow, the body gets mixed messages that may cause cravings for MORE SUGAR. Additionally, studies show that artificial sweeteners cause a variety of health problems, including cancer.

Be careful of “low sugar” products because they often use man-made artificial sweeteners (read the labels). Instead, focus on whole foods where you won’t find added sugars or even packaged foods where sugar is not one of the first three ingredients.

Sideline the Sugar

Look in your kitchen cabinets. Your refrigerator. Your freezer. See if you can find a product that you once thought was a healthy choice but have since discovered an ingredient (added sugar, for example) hiding in plain sight. Take a picture of the front/back and share it with us. Then start researching alternative options that are more nutrient-dense.

If you can’t find anything, score! Maybe talk about a product that you once thought was healthy and have since swapped out for something else.

More Questions About Nutrition?

If you eat quality, nutrient-dense foods and get your portion sizes right the majority of the time, your can still indulge in a small portion of those processed treats on occasion. It doesn’t always have to be “all or nothing.” Yes, structure your diet around nutrient-dense, colorful REAL foods, but also remember that a healthy life is not about macro math or obsessing over everything you put in on your plate.

Read the label, make smart choices, but be nice to yourself…in all areas of life.

And, as always, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Contact your Salus Nutrition Coaches at info@salusnj.com to chat more about your 3-month individualized plan to get the personalized structure you need.

3-Week Body Weight Workouts for Summer Shred

Welcome to the 3-Week Body Weight-Only Program!

We are excited to help you get your at home workout into your routine for the Summer Shred Challenge.

Remember, to earn points for this task, you must take a class at your gym or do a 45 minute workout at home. The workout below is optional. Bookmark this page for future travel workout ideas!

If it is your active recovery day, add in a low intensity 45 min workout, like a walk or easy bike ride to earn your points for that day.

Week 1, Day 1

Warm Up:
Walk outs x 3
Supermans x 15
Side Plank lift x 10 hold & 10
Alternating lunges x 10 each leg
Single-Leg Balance Holds x 30 seconds each leg (:10 sec each position: toe in front, side and back)

Rest 2 minutes then…

10-minute circuit:
20 Alternating -Leg Step-Ups (on stair or sturdy bench)
20 Jumping Jacks
20-yard Bear Crawl
20 Legs Straight Toe Reach Crunches

Day 2

Warm-Up:
30 seconds Inchworms
30 seconds Side Plank (right)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Side Plank (left)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Arm Marching (or Elbows to Palms)
30 seconds Air Squats

60-90 second transition then…

Every 3 minutes for 9 minutes (3 sets):
30 Walking Lunges
20 Bench Dips

60-90 second transition then…

TEST: 2 minutes MAX rep Burpees

60-90 second transition then…

3 Sets:
15 Supermans
15 Single leg VUps
Rest 30 seconds

Mobility and stretching 8 minutes
Choose at least 4 stretches or mobility exercises and spend 2 minutes on each

Day 3

Alternating jog/walk + sprint/walk for 10 rounds:
Jog ~200 Meters
Walk ~200
Sprint ~200 Meters
Walk ~200

Day 4

Warm-Up:
Around the World Lunges x 3 rounds to each lunge position with each foot (forward, lateral, reverse)
Cat-Cow x 10-15 reps
Pushup to Pike stretch x 5

60-90 second transition then…

Three Sets:
60 seconds Alternating Side Lunges
30 seconds Plank Shoulder Taps
30 seconds Glute Bridge Marches
Rest 30 seconds

60-90 second transition then…

Three Sets:
30 seconds Jumping Squats
Rest 15 seconds
30 seconds Flutter Kicks
Rest 15 seconds

60-90 second transition then…

Plank Challenge! — Hold each plank position for 60 seconds without resting (if possible):
Straight arm Plank
Side Plank Left
Side Plank Right
Plank on Forearms
Superman
Hip Bridges

Day 5

Warm Up:

60 seconds Jog
20 seconds High Knees
20 seconds Butt Kickers
20 seconds Skipping
60 seconds Run
60 seconds Jog

60-90 second transition, then…

Every minute on the minute for 8 minutes (Two rounds):
40 seconds of Alternating Lateral Lunges
40 seconds of Super Slow Push-Ups
40 seconds of Side Plank
40 seconds of Side Plank

60-90 second transition, then…

EMOM for 10 minutes (8 rounds):
5 Burpees
10 single leg V-Ups

Day 6

RUNNING WORKOUT
One set of:
Run 1600 Meters (1 mile) at an easy pace
Run 800 Meters (½ mile) at a fast pace
Run 800 Meters (½ mile) at an easy pace
Run 1600 Meters (1 mile) at a fast pace

Mobility and stretching 8 minutes
Choose at least 4 stretches or mobility exercises and spend 2 minutes on each

Day 7

45 minute active recovery like a walk, yoga video, or easy bike ride

Also take time to restore your mind. This will be different for everyone – could be meditation or could be gathering with friends; the key is to engage in activities that make your life full and help you recharge your batteries.

Week 2, Day 1

Warm Up:

Single-Leg Balance Holds x 30 seconds each leg (:10 sec each position: toe in front, side and back)
Walkouts x 3
Supermans x 30 seconds

Rest 60-90 seconds then…

Every 90 seconds for 12 minutes (2 rounds):
A – Single-Leg Deadlift x 10 each leg (hold jug, book, bag, light weight)
B – Side Plank x 30-40 seconds per
side
C – Chair/Stair Dips x max reps
D – Push-Ups x max reps

Rest 60-90 seconds then…

EMOM for 10 Minutes:
Even – 10 burpees
Odd – Single-Single-Double V-Ups

Week 2, Day 2

Warm Up:

Walk/Jog around the block ~5 minutes

EMOM for 4 minutes (2 rounds):
Station 1 – Air Squats x 20
Station 2 – Arm marching from elbows to hands in plank position x 20

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Every 1 minute for 18 minutes (6 sets):
Station 1 – Mountain Climbers
Station 2 – Single-Leg Box/Stair Step-Ups alternating legs
Station 3 – Wall Sit

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Week 2, Day 3

Walk/Jog 5 minutes

Scapular Push-Ups x 10
Lateral Lunges x 10
Plank Walk x 20 steps each direction with hands and feet
Table Top Hip Lift x 10
Mountain Climbers x 20-30

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Three rounds for max reps of:
30 seconds of Air Squats
Rest 30 seconds
30 seconds of Push-Ups
Rest 30 seconds
30 seconds of V-Ups or Crunches
Rest 30 seconds
30 seconds of Burpees
Rest 30 seconds
30 seconds of Mountain Climbers
Rest 30 seconds

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Walk/Jog 5 minutes

Week 2, Day 4

Warm-Up:
30 seconds Inchworms
30 seconds Side Plank (right)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Side Plank (left)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Arm Marching (or Elbows to Palms)
30 seconds Air Squats

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Run 1 mile
20 walking lunges
Run 0.5 miles
20 walking lunges
Run 1 mile

Week 2, Day 5

Tabata Fun!
Set timer to repeat: 20 seconds work/10 seconds rest. Complete 4 sets of one movement before moving onto the next.

• Lunges
• Hollow Hold
• Plank Shoulder Taps

Rest 60 seconds, then…

8-Minute Circuit:
5 Burpee Box/Stair Jump Ups
10 Push-Ups
20 Box/Step Ups
30 Flutter Kicks
~40 Yard Bear Crawl

Rest 2 minutes…

Three Sets:
Single-Arm Plank x 30 seconds (if you are able, lift the same-side foot so the opposite hand and foot are the only things touching the ground)
Superman Hold x 30 seconds
Single-Arm Plank x 30 seconds (if you are able, lift the same-side foot so the opposite hand and foot are the only things touching the ground)
Hip Bridge Hold x 30 seconds

Week 2, Day 6

RUNNING WORKOUT

Every 3 minutes, for 30 minutes (10 sets) for time:
Jog into a Sprint ~400 Meters, walk the rest of the remaining time

Mobility and stretching 8 minutes
Choose at least 4 stretches or mobility exercises and spend 2 minutes on each

Week 2, Day 7

45 minute active recovery like a walk, yoga video, or easy bike ride

Also take time to restore your mind. This will be different for everyone – could be meditation or could be gathering with friends; the key is to engage in activities that make your life full and help you recharge your batteries.

Week 3, Day 1

Warm-Up: Fun with Furniture Sliders on carpet or towel on a hardwood floor
Lunge back (stand on stationary leg, moving leg slides back)
Tuck Ups with sliders under feet, hands on floor
Mountain Climbers with sliders on feet
Hamstring Curls, laying on back, hips lifted in bridge position

60-90 second transition, then…

Every 90 seconds for 12 minutes (2 rounds) – continue the reps until you have about 20 seconds left in the timer:
Station 1 – Lateral Lunges
Station 2 – Supermans
Station 3 – Arm Marching
Station 4 – Tuck-Ups

60-90 second transition, then…

As many rounds and reps as possible in 10 minutes:
200 meter Run
50 meter Bear Crawl
15 Burpees broad jump

Week 3, Day 2

5-minutes:
10 Hollow to Tuck Sit
10 Push-Up rotate to side plank
10 Air Squats + Squat Jump

Rest 60 seconds, then…

5-Minute Circuit:
20 Walking Lunges
3 Wall Climbs
15 Box/Chair Dips

Rest 60 seconds, then…

5-Minute Circuit:
20 Side Step-Ups (10 each side)
15 Toe Reaching Ab Crunches
20 Jumping Jacks

Rest 60 seconds, then…

8-Minute Circuit:
30 Mountain Climbers
10 Superman to Hollow Rolls (5 each direction)
20 Single-Leg Hip Bridges (10 each side)
10 Tuck Jumps

Week 3, Day 3

800 Meter Warm-Up Jog

Followed by. . .

Two sets of:
Sprint 200 Meters

Rest as needed. Then…

“1-Mile Time Trial”
Run 1600 Meters for time

Followed by. . .

800 Meter Cool-Down Run

Week 3, Day 4

Warm-Up:
30 seconds Inchworms
30 seconds Side Plank (right)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Side Plank (left)
30 seconds Hollow Hold
30 seconds Arm Marching (or Elbows to Palms)
30 seconds Air Squats

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Tabata Fun! (20s work/10s rest). Complete 4 sets of one movement before moving onto the next.
A – Push-Ups x 4 sets
Rest 60 seconds
B – Squats x 4 sets
Rest 60 seconds
C – Burpees x 4 sets
Rest 60 seconds
D – Mountain Climbers

60-90 second transition, then…

Two Sets (no rest):
Side Plank (left) x 45 seconds
Side Plank (right) x 45 seconds

Week 3, Day 5

Warm-Up:
60 seconds Plank
60 seconds Hip Bridge lift/lower
60 seconds Plank
60 seconds Wall Sit

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

Every 2 minutes for 15 minutes (3 sets):
A – Single-Leg Box Step-Ups alternating legs
B – Wall Climbs
C – Russian Twist (sit, lean back, keep spine straight, balance on tailbone, twist side to side)

Rest 60 seconds, and then…

AMRAP in 2 minutes (retest from Week 1, Day 1):
MAX Burpees

Week 3, Day 6

RUNNING WORKOUT

Warm up 5 min stretch, walkouts

Run 2 minutes
Walk 1 minute
Repeat for a total duration of 45 minutes

Mobility and stretching 8 minutes
Choose at least 4 stretches or mobility exercises and spend 2 minutes on each

Week 3, Day 7

45 minute active recovery like a walk, yoga video, or easy bike ride

Also take time to restore your mind. This will be different for everyone – could be meditation or could be gathering with friends; the key is to engage in activities that make your life full and help you recharge your batteries.

Congratulations!!